What impact does modern life have on our gut? 

 

Science Magazine Front Cover, Human Food Project

Written by Robert Reed, A Team Foundation.

During August, one of our projects appeared as the main feature for Science Magazine. The journal featured the following peer reviewed paper by Dr Jeff Leach of the Human Food Project:

 "Seasonal cycling in the gut microbiome of the Hadza hunter-gathers of Tanzania".

The paper gives evidence that the microbiome of a hunter-gathering tribe configures with the seasons, individual taxa disappear and reemerge through the annual cycle accordingly. A comparison of the evidence with data (from 18 populations, over 16 countries, with varying lifestyles), proves that modernisation has a direct influence on our gut and its overall well-being. 

The Abstract from Science Magazine: 

"Although humans have cospeciated with their gut-resident microbes, it is difficult to infer features of our ancestral microbiome. Here, we examine the microbiome profile of 350 stool samples collected longitudinally for more than a year from the Hadza hunter-gatherers of Tanzania. The data reveal annual cyclic reconfiguration of the microbiome, in which some taxa become undetectable only to reappear in a subsequent season. Comparison of the Hadza data set with data collected from 18 populations in 16 countries with varying lifestyles reveals that gut community membership corresponds to modernization: Notably, the taxa within the Hadza that are the most seasonally volatile similarly differentiate industrialized and traditional populations. These data indicate that some dynamic lineages of microbes have decreased in prevalence and abundance in modernized populations".

 

Read the full article here.